The Maternal Infant Health Program (MIHP)

A black mother holding her infant.

The Maternal Infant Health Program (MIHP) is a state-sponsored home visiting program for Medicaid-enrolled pregnant people and infants in Michigan, and has been shown to be effective at improving birth outcomes among program participants. Yet MIHP has substantial room to grow participation rates across the state, and many people who initially agree to enroll miss their first appointment.

Impact Evaluation of the Maternal Infant Health Program
With support from a grant awarded by Arnold Ventures, YPL has partnered with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) to conduct an impact evaluation of MIHP. Using a randomized encouragement design, community health workers will provide enhanced recruitment to a subset of individuals who are eligible for MIHP, with a goal of increasing participation in the program. YPL will leverage that increase in participation to evaluate the program’s impact on key maternal and infant health outcomes.

Healthy Moms, Healthy Babies Pilot Project
With funding provided through Governor Whitmer’s Healthy Moms, Healthy Babies initiative, YPL will evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot program to allow MIHP provider agencies to bill for additional services and care coordination for families with high levels of need for basic services. Providers will receive reimbursement for an additional home visit, longer home visits, care coordination services, and a discharge assessment. Key outcomes include social determinants of health, such as food security, financial stability, education, employment, treatment for mental health symptoms, treatment for substance use disorders, parenting support, and access to additional social services.

Reducing No Shows in the Maternal Infant Health Program
YPL has partnered with Michigan Medicine (MM) and its MIHP program to evaluate the impact of a modest cash incentive in reducing no-shows among MIHP participants who receive prenatal care at MM.

Team members

Partners

Michigan Medicine